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AAMI animal car accidents data 2019

By  AAMI

Recent AAMI data has shown some interesting findings around animal collision claims, including when and where they happen most and which animals are most commonly involved.

Time of year when most animal accidents happen

Winter is here. That means, if this year is anything like previous years, animal collisions are about to become much more common.

Despite May being the biggest month for animal collisions (wth 1,039 claims), AAMI’s March 2018-February 2019 claims data suggests that the winter months (June-August) have, on average, more animal collisions than any other season.

Worst time of the year for animal collisions

Region

March 2018- February 2019

March 2017- February 2018

National

May

July

Queensland (QLD)

August

August

New South Wales (NSW)

July

July

Victoria (VIC)

May

October (then July)

Australian Capital Territory (ACT)

July

August

Tasmania (TAS)

June (then July)

June/August

South Australia (SA)

July/September

October (then July)

NB: 41% of animal collisions take place from May-August. (Qld: 42%; NSW: 46%; VIC: 36%; ACT 52%; TAS 38%; SA 36%; WA 34%, NT 51%).

AAMI animal collisions in Australia between March 2018 and February 2019

AAMI spokesperson Ashleigh Paterson said it’s important to be extra careful during the cooler months.

“As the days shorten, motorists are sharing the road with animals for longer periods of time, as animals are most active during dawn and dusk,” Ms Paterson said.

Animals most commonly involved in collisions

Kangaroos are getting into the most trouble on the roads, with 7,992 kangaroo collision claims in the recorded year. Roos made up a whopping 83% of all animal collisions. Wallabies were next with 392 collisions.

Animal collision claims March 2018-February 2019

2019

2018

Kangaroo

83%

Kangaroo

81%

Wallaby

4%

Wallaby

5%

Wombat

4%

Wombat

3%

Dog

2%

Dog

2%

Deer

2%

Deer

1.5%

Animal collision hotspots

VIC has had back-to-back dishnourable wins for having the country’s highest rate of animal collisions, with 3,673 AAMI claims. That’s 779 more than NSW, which had the second most claims with 2,894.

But it was the country’s capital city that had the most animal collisions out of any Australian city. For the third year running, Canberra has made a name for itself. And we’re not talking about occupents/members in Parliament House! It had 98 animal collisions recorded between March 2018 and February 2019.

Wallan was the second biggest animal collision hotspot, with 10% of animal accidents occurring in the Victorian city.

Regardless of the city or region you are driving in, animal collisions are always a possibility. For the safety of both the driver and the wildlife, make sure to drive safely. Read on for some tips on how to avoid a motor collison with an animal.

View AAMI motor vehicle insurance options 

Top animal collision hotspots in Australia

2019 campaign

2018 campaign

1. Canberra, ACT (98)

1. Canberra, ACT

2. Wallan, VIC (52)

2. Goulburn, NSW

3. Heathcote, VIC (49)

3. Sunbury, VIC

4. Gisborne, VIC (41)

4. Cooma, NSW

4. Goulburn, NSW (41)

6. Heathcote, VIC

6. Cooma, NSW (40)

6. Seymour, VIC

6. Queanbeyan, NSW (40)

8. Jindabyne, NSW

8. Dubbo, NSW (39)

9. Bendigo, VIC

9. Kambah, ACT (38)

9. Broken Hill, NSW

10. Bungendore, NSW (36)

9. Gisborne, VIC

Top animal collision hotspots in NSW

2019 campaign
2018 campaign

1. Goulburn (41)

6. Broken Hill (29)

2. Cooma (40)

6. Cobar (29)

2. Queanbeyan (40)

6. Jindabyne (29)

4. Dubbo (39)

9. Mudgee (28)

5. Bungendore (36)

10. Bywong (26)

Top animal collision hotspots in VIC

2019 campaign
2018 campaign

1. Wallan (52)

5. Craigieburn (31)

2. Heathcote (46)

8. Lysterfield (30)

3. Gisborne (41)

9. South Morang (26)

4. Seymour (34)

9. Benalla (26)

5. Bendigo (31)

9. Doreen (26)

5. Sunbury (31)

Top animal collision hotspots in QLD

2019 campaign
2018 campaign

1. Goondiwindi (20)

8. Cunnamulla (9)

2. Moranbah (12)

10. Mareeba (8)

3. Saint George (11)

10. Bowen (8)

3. Bundaberg (11)

10. Emerald (8)

3. Cloncurry (11)

10. Nebo (8)

6. Rockhampton (10)

10. Longreach (8)

6. Blackwater (10)

10. Toowomba (8)

8. Warwick (9)

Top animal collision hotspots in Western Australia (WA)

2019 campaign
2018 campaign

1. Baldivis (17)

6. Brabham (6)

2. Margaret River (11)

6. Bunbury (6)

3. Geraldton (7)

6. Dwellingup (6)

3. Jurien Bay (7)

6. Exmouth (6)

3. Mandurah (7)

6. Klbarri (6)

6. Perth (6)

6. Pinjarra (6)

Top animal collision hotspots in South Australia (SA)

2019 campaign
2018 campaign

1. Port Augusta (22)

3. Renmark (8)

2. Hawker (9)

7. Morgan (7)

3. Mount Gambier (8)

8. Woomera (5)

3. Glendambo (8)

8. Pimba (5)

3. Burra (8)

8. McLaren Vale

Top animal collision hotspots in Tasmania (TAS)

2019 campaign
2018 campaign

1. Hobart (12)

10. George Town (4)

2. Launceston (11)

10. Glenorchy (4)

3. Campbell town (10)

10. Hillwood (4)

4. Swansea (9)

10. Longford (4)

5. Nunamara (7)

10. Margate (4)

6. Bridport (6)

10. Mornington (4)

6. Deloraine (6)

10. Pipers River (4)

6. Smithton (6)

10. Runnymede (4)

9. Geilston Bay (5)

10. Strahan (4)

9. Sandford (5)

Top animal collision hotspots in ACT

2019 campaign
2018 campaign

1. Canberra (98)

6. Brabham (6)

2. Kambah (38)

6. Bunbury (6)

3. Hume (26)

8. Deakin (16)

4. Tuggeranong (21)

9. Wanniassa (15)

5. Symonston (19) 

9. Red Hill (15)

6. Belconnen (18)

9. Tharwa (15)

7. Majura (18)

Top animal collision hotspots in Northern Territory (NT)

2019 campaign
2018 campaign

1. Katherine (10)

7. Kakadu (2)

2. Alice Springs (9)

7. Humpty Doo (2)

3. Adelaide River (4)

7. Daly Waters (2)

4. Darwin (3)

7. Erldunda (2)

4. Mataranka (3)

7. Burrundie (2)

4. Tennant Creek (3)

AAMI driving safety tips

While it’s important to be extra vigilant during the winter months, in animal collision hotspots, and during dawn and dusk, drivers should always follow these safety tips when driving.

  • Stay alert and expect the unexpected.
  • Avoid driving at dawn and dusk, if possible.
  • Take extra care driving in regional areas.
  • If you see one kangaroo, expect others to be nearby.
  • Do not swerve. Slow down and brake.
  • If you notice road kill, slow down and pay extra attention. It’s an indicator of wildlife in the area.
  • If you spot a kangaroo crossing the road, it's a sign that more roos will be following as they move in groups.
  • If you’re involved in a collision with an animal, stop to check its welfare, but only if it is safe to do so. If the animal is alive and injured call your local wildlife rescue service.
  • If it’s a dead kangaroo and it is safe to do so, check if it is a female and if there’s a joey(s) in her pouch or around her. Pouches/flaps of wombats and echidnas should also be checked as well as the surrounding area, as often young echidnas are dislodged during a vehicle collision. Watch out for other traffic which might not expect to see you on the road or roadside. Do not do so if it’s unsafe.
  • Use your peripheral vision and be aware of your surroundings, especially when travelling through forest or grassland areas where animals are not clearly visible.

The information is intended to be of a general nature only. We do not accept any legal responsibility for any loss incurred as a result of reliance upon it – please make your own enquiries.

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