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AAMI Crash Index 2016: Most Common Accidents in Australia

By  AAMI

Ever bumped into another car from behind? Or smacked a still object while reversing? You’re not alone. Our research shows these types of crashes are some of the most common in Australia

Most Common Types of Accidents in Australia 2016

Accident Type

Nose to tail

Collision with stationary object

Failed to give-way

Collision while reversing

Hit an animal

Other

Number

69,679

51,714

50,512

23,805

9,891

2,084

Percentage

34%

25%

25%

11%

5%

1%

Each year at AAMI we analyse tens of thousands of claims to bring you the latest data on Australian roads. This year we broke down the figures (claims from August 2015 – August 2016) state-by-state to reveal some surprising trends when it comes to the most popular pile-ups: 

  • Drivers in New South Wales struggle to give way, with accidents of this type 5% higher than the national average
  • Victorian drivers reported the greatest number of nose to tail incidents, with over 30,429 claims
  • When it comes to giving way, Queenslanders boasted less incidents (20%) than the other two big states NSW (29%) and VIC (25%) and the national average (24%)
  • South Australian drivers had one of the least number of collisions while reversing, reporting only 792 incidents
  • Stationary objects proved the greatest challenge for Tasmanian drivers, accounting for 39% of the state’s collisions
  • Canberrans and drivers in the ACT recorded the most accidents involving an animal 
  • Western Australians behind the wheel had surprisingly little trouble with animals, only reporting 573 accidents statewide

What does it mean for you? To avoid collisions, AAMI spokesperson Jake Krausmann says patience and awareness of driving conditions is critical.

“Leaving plenty of room between [your car] and the vehicle in front, and being patient in heavy traffic can make a big difference,” he said. 

With nearly four out of five (79.2 per cent) of all accident insurance claims occurring within 25 kilometres of the driver’s house, Mr Krausmann also underscored the importance of never taking driving conditions for granted. 

“We have busy lives and daily schedules,” he noted. “Regardless of how familiar you are with your local area, it doesn’t dilute the importance of concentration and safe driving behaviours.” Below we list the most common causes of crashes in Australia state by state. For a quick summary of the top five causes of crashes Australia-wide, watch this

New South Wales

NSW

Nose to tail (29.36%)

Failed to give-way (29.10%)

Collision with stationary object (24.51%)

Collision while reversing (11.40%)

Hit an animal (4.62%)

National

Nose to tail (33.55%)

Collision with stationary object (24.90%)

Failed to give-way (24.32%)

Collision while reversing (11.46%)

Hit an animal (4.76%)

New South Wales (NSW) has one of the country’s highest rates of accidents caused by drivers failing to give way, the AAMI Crash Index 2016 reveals.

Over a 12 month period, almost one in three (29.10 per cent) collisions on NSW roads were as a result of failure to give-way. This was substantially higher than the national average (one in four).

While nose-to-tail collisions were also a common occurrence (almost one in three), when compared with the rest of the country, NSW drivers were one of the nation’s least likely to be involved in this type of accident.

Victoria 

Victoria

Nose to tail (34.38%)

Failed to give-way (25.23%)

Collision with stationary object (23.78%)

Collision while reversing (11.60%)

Hit an animal (4.09%)

National

Nose to tail (33.55%)

Collision with stationary object (24.90%)

Failed to give-way (24.32%)

Collision while reversing (11.46%)

Hit an animal (4.76%)

Victoria has the nation’s highest rate of accidents caused by drivers colliding into the car in front, according to the latest AAMI Crash Index.

Over a 12 month period, more than a third (34.38 per cent) of accidents on Victorian roads were caused by nose to tail collisions – slightly higher than the national average.

“Nose to tail accidents continue to be the most common collision type nationally, and are usually the result of impatient driving, distraction or following the car in front to closely,” Mr Krausmann says.

“We have busy lives and daily schedules, and as a result can be prone to dangerous driving behaviours.”

Victorian drivers were also one of the nations most likely to be involved in an accident caused by failure to give away, but the least likely to have hit an animal.

Queensland

QLD

Nose to tail (32.42%)

Collision with stationary object (28.41%)

Failed to give-way (19.82%)

Collision while reversing (12.56%)

Hit an animal (5.47%)

National

Nose to tail (33.55%)

Collision with stationary object (24.90%)

Failed to give-way (24.32%)

Collision while reversing (11.46%)

Hit an animal (4.76%)

Nose-to-tail accidents continue to be the most common collision type in the country’s sunshine state, according to the latest AAMI Crash Index.

Over a 12 month period, almost one in three (32.42 per cent) accidents on Queensland roads were as a result of drivers running up the back of the car in front, while one in five was caused by drivers failing to give way.

“Nose to tail accidents continue to be the most common collision type nationally, and are usually the result of impatient driving, distraction or following the car in front to closely,” Mr Krausmann said.

“We have busy lives and daily schedules, but ‘tailgating’ the car in front won’t get you to your destination any faster.

“You should always be prepared for the unexpected, and if the car in front stops unexpectedly, you want to ensure you have enough room to brake safely. There’s a general two second rule for following the car in front, but the more room you can leave the better.”

Australian Capital Territory

Australian Capital Territory

Nose to tail (32.40%)

Collision with stationary object (22.85%)

Failed to give-way (16.39%)

Collision while reversing (11.20%)

Hit an animal (9.29%)

National

Nose to tail (33.55%)

Collision with stationary object (24.90%)

Failed to give-way (24.32%)

Collision while reversing (11.46%)

Hit an animal (4.76%)

Nose-to-tail crashes continue to be the most common accident type on ACT roads, the AAMI Crash Index results show.

In the past year, almost one in three (32.4 per cent) incidents across the region  were a result of drivers colliding into the back of another vehicle, while more than one in five involved hitting a stationary object and nearly one in 10 involved hitting an animal. 

“ACT drivers should also keep a lookout for wildlife on the road, particularly on country roads and rural and regional areas near national parks and forests,” Mr Krausmann said.

“Wildlife is unpredictable and can appear out of nowhere, so it’s important to slow down and be aware of your environment, particularly inside sign-posted wildlife areas.”

Western Australia

Western Australia

Nose to tail (33.19%)

Collision with stationary object (28.90%)

Failed to give-way (19.56%)

Collision while reversing (12.83%)

Hit an animal (4.34%)

National

Nose to tail (33.55%)

Collision with stationary object (24.90%)

Failed to give-way (24.32%)

Collision while reversing (11.46%)

Hit an animal (4.76%)

WA drivers were the nation’s most likely to have been involved in an accident while reversing – reinforcing the need for drivers to be aware of their surroundings and other drivers at all times.

Many reversing collisions are often caused by drivers not being aware of what is behind them.

South Australia

South Australia

Collision with stationary object (30.65%)

Nose to tail (28.01%)

Failed to give-way (22.39%)

Collision while reversing (11.75%)

Hit an animal (6.02%)

National

Nose to tail (33.55%)

Collision with stationary object (24.90%)

Failed to give-way (24.32%)

Collision while reversing (11.46%)

Hit an animal (4.76%)

South Australia has one of the country’s highest rates of accidents caused by collisions with a stationary object — second only after Tasmania.

Tasmania

Tasmania

Collision with stationary object (39.20%)

Nose to tail (17.82%)

Failed to give-way (17.7%)

Collision while reversing (11.79%)

Hit an animal (11.93%)

National

Nose to tail (33.55%)

Collision with stationary object (24.90%)

Failed to give-way (24.32%)

Collision while reversing (11.46%)

Hit an animal (4.76%)

Concentration could be key for Tasmanian drivers, with state having the high rate of accidents (40%) caused by drivers hitting a stationary object (which in most cases was a parked car).

Tasmanian drivers were also revealed as the most likely to have hit an animal (one in ten) – substantially higher than the national average. 

Disclaimer: Insurance is issued by AAI Limited ABN 48 005 297 807 trading as AAMI. Consider the Product Disclosure Statement before making a decision about this insurance. This advice has been prepared without taking into account your particular objectives, financial situation or needs, so you should consider whether it is appropriate for you before acting on it.