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Melbourne keeps hold of national crash crown

By  AAMI

For the fifth consecutive year, Springvale Road in Glen Waverly, Melbourne has been revealed as Australia’s national hotspot for car accidents, according to the 2017 AAMI Crash Index.

This notorious stretch of road is part of a major thoroughfare in Melbourne’s eastern suburbs and attracts high volumes of traffic during peak and off-peak times.

“Springvale Road is a multi-lane road used throughout the day by both commuters and local traffic. It features numerous intersections and traffic lights and is a key access point for a large shopping centre,” said AAMI spokesperson Michael Mills.

“The high volume of vehicles entering at multiple points, and frequent stopping and starting at the different intersections creates plenty of opportunities for small misjudgements and lapses in concentration which can lead to a serious collision.”

While Springvale Road maintained its hold on the top ranking, many of the other capital cities saw new hotspots take top position.

Sydney, Brisbane, Darwin, Adelaide and Hobart had new stretches of road ‘crowned’, while the incumbents in Perth and Canberra retained their rankings.

Analysis of motor accident insurance claims across the country from 1 August 2016 to 31 July 2017 revealed the top accident-prone hotspot in each capital city to be:

Top Accident-Prone Hotspots in Australia

“We strongly encourage all drivers to be mindful of safe driving behaviours when travelling on our roads, especially when they find themselves in one of these accident-prone areas,” said Mr Mills

“Concentration is key, especially when travelling in heavy traffic. It’s important to leave enough room between you and the car in front, keep to the speed limit and avoid distractions like mobile phones.”

AAMI’s latest research into driver behaviours revealed that around half of motorists (45 per cent) thought distracted drivers were one of biggest dangers on the road.

“Despite this, a significant number of motorists are still taking dangerous risks while behind the wheel,” said Mr Mills.

“One in five drivers would text while stationary at traffic lights if they could get away with it and one in four would have a conversation on loudspeaker with their phone in their lap.

“More than a third of drivers (38 per cent) also said it was really hard to resist the temptation to check their phones.”

If you were sure you could get away with it, what would you feel comfortable doing?

If you were sure you could get away with it, what would you feel comfortable doing?

Action

National

NSW/ACT

Vic

Qld

SA

WA

Texting while driving

3%

3%

4%

3%

4%

3%

Texting while stopped at traffic lights

19%

19%

17%

18%

18%

19%

Using a GPS system with your phone on your lap

16%

14%

17%

14%

21%

18%

Having a verbal phone conversation with the phone in your hand

9%

8%

11%

7%

6%

7%

Having a verbal phone conversation with speakerphone on and the handset on  your lap

23%

23%

21%

22%

23%

27%

Having a verbal phone conversation with a hands-free kit in your ear

49%

47%

48%

48%

46%

51%

Setting a GPS navigation system while stopped at traffic lights

38%

35%

41%

38%

39%

40%

Using your hands to dial a number on your mobile while stopped at traffic lights

22%

19%

23%

22%

23%

24%

“While it’s comforting to know that many drivers are uncomfortable with texting or holding phones while they’re driving, there are still alarming numbers of drivers who don’t see the potential harm of other common distractions,” said Mr Mills.

“Even when used legally, mobile phones can be very distracting for drivers – particularly phone calls. We would urge drivers to limit their use of phones while they’re driving and only operate them when it is absolutely safe to do so.”

AAMI Crash Index - Australia's Accident Hotspots