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Nose-to-tail collisions are the number one crash on Aussie roads

By  AAMI

2013 AAMI Crash Index reveals parked car dings are on the rise Nearly a third of drivers blame distraction or loss of concentration for their accidents

Aussie drivers are finding themselves in nose-to-tail accidents more often than any other type of crash, according to new data from leading national car insurer, AAMI.

After studying almost 250,000 accident insurance claims between October 2012 and September 2013 for the annual AAMI Crash Index, the five most common types of accidents happening on our roads are:

Most Common Accident Type

1. Nose to tail

27.8%

2. Parked car dings

21.4%

3. Failed to give way

20.5%

4. Collision with a stationary object

14.7%

5. Collision while reversing

11.%

Previous Crash Index reports show that the incidence of nose-to-tail collisions has remained stable for the past decade, hovering between 27% and 29%. Failure to give way has come down steadily during this time from 23.1% in 2001 to 20.5% in the past 12 months.

Parked car dings however continue on an upward trend having risen from 15% in 2004 to 21.4% in this year’s Crash Index.  According to AAMI spokesperson, Reuben Aitchison, with drivers taking to the roads for the holiday season that’s a worrying statistic.

“Parked car dings are often a result of not driving the car properly or paying attention to what’s going on around you. As we lead into the silly season, we urge all drivers to stay alert when behind the wheel, particularly during the Christmas period when we see a significant rise in the number of serious accidents and minor prangs.”

AAMI’s research[i] has shown that alarmingly a third of drivers (28%) identified distraction or loss of concentration as a contributing factor in their crash, with men being the worst offenders (32%) compared to just under one in four women (24%).

Mr Aitchison said: “Smart phones and technology are major distractions for motorists and pose a serious safety issue on our roads. We know that many young drivers regularly read and send text messages, tweet, update their Facebook status and astonishingly even read e-books while driving.

“However, it doesn’t matter if you’re adjusting a Sat Nav or looking out the window, allowing yourself to be distracted and take your eyes off the road, even for a split second, is incredibly dangerous for you and everyone else on the road.”

According to AAMI’s Crash Index, a quarter of motorists have experienced an accident in the last five years. 71% say that accident was avoidable. Interestingly in the past five years most accidents occurred when vehicles were travelling at low speed (47%) or stationary (28%). Only 20% experienced accidents when travelling at high speed.

AAMI’s data has also shown that almost half (46%) of drivers blame other drivers for the cause of their crash and nearly a quarter (23%) admit to being careless while behind the wheel.

Top 10 Contributing Factors

1. Other driver(s)

46%

2. Distraction/Loss of concentration

28%

3. Carelessness

23%

4. Bad Weather

12%

5. Impatience

12%

6. Traffic Congestion

10%

7. Bad roads/infrastructure

10%

8. Fatigue

6%

9. Speeding

6%

10. Animal on road

5%