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Victorian drivers worst in the country for nose to tail crashes

By  AAMI

Motorists in Victoria are more likely to be involved in nose to tail crashes than drivers in the rest of the country, according to new data revealed in the latest AAMI Crash Index.

For the second year in a row, Victorian drivers top the list for being the worst in the country for nose to tail crashes and are among the worst in the nation for failing to give way.

Analysis of AAMI’s claims data, covering more than 133,000 accidents in Victoria from July 2016 to June 2017, showed the five most common types of crashes are: 

VIC

National

1. Nose to tail (33.37%)

1. Nose to tail (30.74%)

2. Failed to give way (24.53%)

2. Failed to give way (22.72%)

3. Collision with a stationary object (16.98%)

3. Collision with a stationary object (20.58%)

4. Collision while reversing (11.84%)

4. Collision while reversing (11.68%)

5. Collision with a parked car (8.61%)

5. Collision with a parked car (7.96%)

AAMI spokesperson Michael Mills said Victorian drivers should pay more attention behind the wheel and ensure impatience does not get the better of them.

“Driver distraction continues to be a leading cause of nose to tail and parked car crashes. If you get behind the wheel of a car you should be concentrating on what’s in front of you, what’s happening around you and driving to the conditions.

“Most of the time it comes down to people becoming distracted and multi-tasking while driving. Taking your eyes off the road for just a split second can have devastating consequences, and even the smallest distraction can be deadly. It’s just not worth the risk,” Mr Mills warned.

“Garden State drivers are also guilty of ‘tailgating’ behaviour. This is indicative of the high proportion (almost a third) of Victorian drivers crashing nose to tail. Maintaining a good distance between you and the car in front is one of the most effective ways of keeping yourself and others safe, and allows additional time to stop if the car in front suddenly brakes.

“Giving way on the road is another area needing improvement, and is often a result of impatient driving,” Mr Mills said.

Analysis of AAMI’s national claims data revealed that nose to tail collisions continues to be the number one type of accident on Australian roads, with more than a third (30.74 per cent) of drivers crashing into the car in front.

According to AAMI research* in the past year one in five (22 per cent) Australian drivers have had a near miss because they were distracted while driving.

More than a quarter (28 per cent) of Australian drivers have also been honked at for not moving off when the lights changed because they were distracted.

Nine in 10 (91 per cent) Aussie drivers admit it makes them angry when they see other motorists using a mobile phone while driving. Despite feeling this way, nearly two in five (37 per cent) find it hard to resist the temptation to check their phone when they hear a text while driving.

NSW

1. Nose to tail (30.86%)

2. Collision with a stationary object (19.93%)

3. Failed to give way (24.94%)

4. Collision while reversing (10.62%)

5. Collision with a parked car (7.31%)

WA

1. Nose to tail (28.30%)

2. Collision with a stationary object (25.58%)

3. Failed to give way (17.86%)

4. Collision while reversing (13.14%)

5. Collision with a parked car (8.50%)

QLD

1. Nose to tail (29.12%)

2. Collision with a stationary object (24.52%)

3. Failed to give way (18.39%)

4. Collision while reversing (12.48%)

5. Collision with a parked car (7.39%)

SA

1. Nose to tail (24.43%)

2. Collision with a stationary object (26.31%)

3. Failed to give way (20.96%)

4. Collision while reversing (12.45%)

5. Collision with a parked car (8.91%)

TAS

1. Nose to tail (16.27%)

2. Collision with a stationary object (31.36%)

3. Failed to give way (17.49%)

4. Collision while reversing (12.88%)

5. Collision with an animal (10.35%)

*AAMI research surveyed 1,255 Australian drivers aged 16+ from around the country. The research was conducted in May 2017 by Lonergan Research.